After the two expeditions to the "Bird's Head Seascape" led by the Conservation International (CI) in 2006, the Marine world have unfolded a set of amazing facts that were hidden so far in dreary world of obscurity.

Well this is an old story for the people related to the marine world and smaller or bigger aquarists across the globe. I'm sure, millions around me are still in desperate love of multi-colored marine creatures, but haven't yet heard of the epaulette Walking Shark. Discovered in the "Bird's Head Seascape" just as recently as September 2006, a list of 50 unknown marine species, includes this amazing slender-bodied shark that can walk with the pectoral fins along the sea floor and multicolored schools of coral reefs.

Apart from these two kinds of Walking Sharks the resrarchers discovered 8 new kinds of Shrimps, 20 species of hard corals, 22 species of other fishes that are were not listed in any science journals before these expeditions. "Bird's Head Seascape", which is a distinctive peninsula located on the northwestern end of Papua province in Indonesia has become a spot of attention for researchers because of its marine biodiversity.

These Sharks are not much bigger in size... about 1 to 1.2 meters in length when matured and live on shrimp, small fish, crabs and snails. They walk along the bottom of the sea if not disturbed, but swim away fast if spooked. Not much know about this entirely new species of shark... scientists are burning their midnight oil to know more about their breeding and dietary habbits. However, constant threats are being warranted to sustainability of such rare marine species from over-fishing with dynamite and cyanide and not to be forgotten wanton deforestation and mining.

These Walking sharks are called "Epaulette sharks" because of the presence of a couple of large round spots near their heads, which resemble very much the shoulder ornaments that are worn by military officers on their uniforms.

Watch out these clips that I got from Youtube. Special thanks to Youtube.




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Music on the Mind, stimulating mind, relaxing music, bach Music therapy, liquid mind, music for health, Stimulation of Brainwave, Music for the Mind, Psychology of Music psychology, Musical Perceptions, Music Improves Mood,  Secret of Music Therapy, Music on the Mind, stimulating mind, relaxing music, bach Music therapy, liquid mind, music for health, Stimulation of Brainwave, Music for the Mind, Psychology of Music psychology, Musical Perceptions, Music Improves Mood,  Secret of Music Therapy
I've been amongst those very intelligent guys, who never did well in the exams. I am sure there are lots amidst the mob out there, who are like me and some of my acquaintances, who used to solve the toughest integrals and differentials with music played in the background. I just wondered why couldn't I solve the easiest Standard Deviations in the exam, while the toughest probabilities were simple for me at home . I realized that it was the music that made the difference. Well, I couldn't tolerate hard rocks and massive beats; symphonies of John Tesh (Piano), Yanni (Piano) Eugene Rousseau (sax), Kim Hutchcroft (sax) and Kenny G (sax) were some I've always been comfortable with.

Later in the year 2000, I just chanced to drop by an article of Gordon L. Shaw, Ph.D. M.I.N.D. University of California, that gave me a clue why I've always been an utter flop in the exams. Gordon L. Shaw and the colleagues of the Center of the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, University of California, USA said that the music not only entertains and motivates, but also enhances our thought process. In the study with some 36 college students, liquid mind, music for health, Music for the Mind, Psychology of Music psychology, Musical Perceptions, Music Improves Mood,  Secret of Music Therapy, Music on the Mind, stimulating mind, relaxing music, bach Music therapy, liquid mind, music for health, Stimulation of Brainwave, Music for the Mind, Psychology of Music psychology, Musical Perceptions, Music Improves Mood,  Secret of Music Therapy, Music on the Mind, stimulating mind, relaxing music, bach Music therapyDr Shaw and his team tried to find if there was any truth in the belief that good tunes can fine-tune our minds too. He used symphonies of W A Mozart and asked the students to recognize and compare te intricate patterns including folds and cut papers - standard tests for mathematical ability and reasoning. They were repeatedly; some tested were carried just after a short time relaxation without listening to Mozart. Surprisingly the students scored better grades in the tests that followed listening to Mozart, while in the other condition the responses were not satisfactory. Believe it or not... after the discovery of the 'Mozart Effect' by Dr. Gordon Shaw researchers are thinking of using music to revolutionize the mathematics education!

The experiment includes the following steps:

  • College students showed amazing enhancement of 'Spatial-temporal reasoning' after listening to Mozart Sonata for Two Pianos in D Major. This experiment of Dr. Gordon L. Shaw and Dr. Frances Rauscher recieved tremendous attention across the globe in the year 1993 and the media termed it as "Mozart Effect".
  • Patients suffering from Alzheimer disease showed short term enhancement in 'Spatial-temporal reasoning' right after listening to Mozart Sonata.
  • Patients suffering epilepsy showed reduced tendencies of seizures after listening to Mozart Sonata.
  • Brain imaging studies showed a striking increase in brain activities when Mozart was played.
NB: 'Spatial-temporal reasoning' involves transforming as well as comparing mental images in time and space, crucial in doing mathematical calculations, playing games like chess etc.

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Shubho Sashti-r Preeti 'o' Subhechha to all you guys at the very outset.

Well now let me flag on the voyage! Let me start off with the question that created an impact in my mind. Mannan's question... Why wasn't he able to tickle himself? First off, I don't remember where exactly I found the answer and when. I found it years back - probably in the year 1999 or 2000. Here's why can't people tickle themselves:

Getting tickled is an exciting feeling - a feeling that great minds have failed to explain. All you can say is, its amusing... its exciting... its something typical that creates an unexplained feeling. To understand why can't we tickle ourselves, just know why can we tickle others first. Whenever you're tickling your friend, the sensation is soon recognized and picked up by some special nerve endings of his body. These nerves are called "Mechano Receptive Nerves". The Mechano Receptive Nerve endings are located right beneath the skin. These nerves pick up the sensation (information) and transmit it to the spinal chord and thereafter the lower brain stem through some tiny fibers, which are called 'C-Type Fibers'. This entire process of transmission happens very slowly (at a very slow speed), which is why people feel ticklish. During this time of transmission the superficial muscles in our body tend to move to accommodate the sensation. This movement of these muscles are controlled by 'Cerebellum' (The dorsally projecting part of our brain that is mainly concerned with coordination of muscles and the maintenance of equilibrium of the body). Coordination of muscles by cerebellum is not only concerned with the muscular movement, but it controls and arrests them too. The arresting function of the muscular movements by cerebellum is called 'Damping Action'.

Now when you try to tickle yourself your cerebellum gets the information information before ti actually happens. It blocks the process of transmitting the sensation and you don't feel ticklish. So you cannot tickle yourself due to a different process, where your cerebellum detects your self-inflicted touch beforehand and it sends the information to the rest of the brain. The resulting sensation is thus ignored. So no point wasting time trying to fool your brain by tickling yourself.

The mystery 'why can't we tickle ourselves' has been puzzling great minds for years. A pack of British scientists at University College London have solved it.

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